Tag Archives: négos

Treasury Board bargaining: Trudeau’s window to deliver on commitment to public service workers is closing

Bargaining

The clock is ticking for the Trudeau Liberals as PSAC’s four bargaining teams representing 90,000 workers covered by Treasury Board resume negotiations with the government between March 19 and 21.

Since bargaining began nine months ago, PSAC’s teams have presented proposals to improve work-life balance, reduce precarious contract work, close wage gaps with the private sector, and ensure fair economic increases. Yet, for most of that time, the government has repeatedly delayed progress, and in late November made an insulting offer that would freeze wages for two years.

While the last session of talks in February yielded a few smalls steps in the right direction, far more significant progress must be achieved this month. Reaching a fair agreement before the federal election in October is the only way Justin Trudeau can deliver on his promises to PSAC members.

In a 2015 letter to public service workers, Trudeau committed to restoring the government’s “trust in — and respect for — our public servants”. Moreover, Trudeau has recognized that public service workers “continue to show unwavering professionalism as they face unacceptable hardships caused by the implementation of the Phoenix pay system.”

“Over the last four years, Trudeau has said all the right things about the public service,” said Chris Aylward, PSAC National President. “But actions speak louder than words, and PSAC members are still waiting for him to deliver on his commitment to them. They’re still waiting to get paid properly under Phoenix and they’re still waiting to be compensated for all the hardships they’ve endured because of these countless pay problems. They shouldn’t also have to wait for the fair working conditions they deserve.”

“The window of opportunity for Trudeau to deliver on his commitment to support public service workers and the vital services they provide Canadians is closing, but it’s still there. This means delivering a fair deal for our members before the next election – and we won’t let his government off the hook.”

These sessions cover four bargaining units under Treasury Board: Program & Administrative Services (PA), Technical Services (TC), Operations Services (SV), and Education & Library Science (EB).

The original version of this article was first posted on the PSAC website.

FB Bargaining: Limited progress during second meeting

Photo of a BSO - Photo d'un ASF

The PSAC-CIU bargaining team representing the Border Services (FB) group met with Treasury Board/CBSA the week of February 25 for a second negotiating session towards a new collective agreement.

Harassment protections

In light of CBSA’s February 27 ‘Pink Shirt Day’ initiative to raise awareness about harassment in the workplace, the bargaining team reminded CBSA and Treasury Board that there are serious problems with abuse of authority and harassment by management in CBSA workplaces across the country. Considering these serious, ongoing problems, the union is looking for much greater protections against harassment from CBSA management in the next contract.

Telework

The bargaining team asked CBSA about its plans on telework and presented formal proposals for new collective agreement articles on the matter. PSAC-CIU has been pushing for years for greater access to teleworking opportunities for Trade Compliance officers and other non-uniformed personnel.

The team also reminded CBSA that, under the law, the Agency must consult the union and gain the union’s consent before moving forward with any changes in the current terms and conditions of employment. The Agency has effectively ignored the Treasury Board policy on telework for many years.

Maternity and Parental Leave

The union proposed a 93% top up for the new 18-month maternity and parental leave option introduced by the government in 2017. The employer rejected this but the bargaining team indicated it will continue maintaining this proposal.

Click here to review PSAC-CIU’s package of proposals as well as those of the employer.

The next negotiating session will be held the week of April 8. For more information visit psacunion.ca/fb

The original version of this article was first posted on the PSAC website.

Treasury Board bargaining inches towards progress, but not far enough

Bargaining

Following more than six months of frustrating talks and delays by the government, PSAC bargaining teams representing 90,000 members finally received some responses to the union’s proposals this past week. The government’s small movements were a noticeable change from previous meetings but they fell significantly short of the progress needed at the table.

Bargaining teams reaffirmed a range of proposals for improving working conditions while also discussing the government’s counterproposals around work-life balance—including compassionate care, bereavement and parental leave—as well as general economic increases.

“We’ve made it clear to the Trudeau government that we expect new Treasury Board President Jane Philpott to have a mandate to reach a fair deal with us,” said PSAC National President, Chris Aylward. “These recent talks were a small first step in that direction, but we expect far more progress at our next session.”

“The modest movement we’ve seen is a result of the pressure and mobilization of our membership in response to the government’s many delays. It’s clear we need to not only keep up the pressure, but ramp it up in the weeks and months to come.”

“We are now on the eve of the third anniversary of the Phoenix pay system disaster and our members continue delivering the quality public services Canadians rely on every day, even as they wait to get paid correctly. They shouldn’t also have to wait for the fair working conditions they deserve. The clock is ticking.”

Treasury Board also decided that it will no longer negotiate issues of concern to all four bargaining groups at a common table. While this approach needlessly makes for less efficient negotiations, all four bargaining teams will move forward with a joint and unified approach to negotiating all common issues, even if it happens at separate tables.

This past week’s sessions  were held between February 12 and 14 and covered four bargaining units under Treasury Board: Program & Administrative Services (PA)Technical Services (TC)Operations Services (SV), and Education & Library Science (EB).

The next bargaining meetings will be held from March 19 to 21  in Ottawa.

Join us: On February 28, PSAC will kick off a series of escalated actions around the country in support of Phoenix damages and a fair deal at the bargaining table.

The original version of this article was first posted on the PSAC website.

PA, EB, SV & TC bargaining to resume February 12 – PSAC demands new mandate from Trudeau

Bargaining

PSAC will be resuming face-to-face bargaining sessions from February 12 to 14 on behalf of the 90,000 federal public service workers covered by Treasury Board bargaining. The union’s top priority is to obtain a fair wage settlement, and improvements in areas such as work-life balance, workload, leave provisions, and the use of temporary workers.

After many months of frustrating talks with the government, PSAC members are still waiting for a proper response to the union’s bargaining proposals. In December, the government insulted federal public service workers by coming to the table with a proposal for a two-year wage freeze.

“We will mobilize members to pressure Prime Minister Trudeau to live up to his promise of a new relationship with public service workers – one of respect,” said PSAC National President, Chris Aylward. “His Government is betraying our members and Canadians who depend on high quality public service.”

“New Treasury Board President, Jane Philpott must get a new mandate from the Prime Minister – one that will allow a fair deal. Our members have been waiting three years to get paid correctly under Phoenix – they shouldn’t also have to wait for the decent working conditions they deserve.”

Next week’s sessions will cover four bargaining units under Treasury Board: Program & Administrative Services (PA), Technical Services (TC), Operations Services (SV), and Education & Library Science (EB).

A version of this article was first posted on the PSAC website.

PA, EB, SV & TC bargaining to resume – PSAC demands new mandate from Trudeau

Bargaining

This week, the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board (FPSLREB) refused to establish a Public Interest Commission, which could have brought PSAC and the government closer to reaching an agreement on behalf of 90,000 workers covered by Treasury Board bargaining.

In response, PSAC will be ramping up pressure on Treasury Board so that it returns to the bargaining table with a proper and full response to the members’ bargaining proposals. In December, the government insulted federal public service workers by coming to the table with a proposal for a two-year wage freeze.

PSAC has secured new face-to-face bargaining sessions in February. Our top priority is to obtain a fair wage settlement, and improvements in areas such as work-life balance, workload, leave provisions, and the use of temporary workers.

“We will mobilize members to pressure Prime Minister Trudeau to live up to his promise of a new relationship with public service workers – one of respect,” said PSAC National President, Chris Aylward. “His Government is betraying our members and Canadians who depend on high quality public service.”

“New Treasury Board President, Jane Philpott must get a new mandate from the Prime Minister – one that will allow a fair deal. Our members have been waiting three years to get paid correctly under Phoenix – they shouldn’t also have to wait for the decent working conditions they deserve.”

Upcoming negotiation sessions will cover table-specific proposals for the four bargaining groups: Program & Administrative Services (PA), Technical Services (TC), Operations Services (SV), and Education & Library Science (EB); followed by discussions concerning issues common to all teams.

A version of this article was first posted on the PSAC website.